It’s a waste of words, at this point, to bemoan the flailing publishing industry and the decline of the traditional newspaper. When it comes to print, there’s a feeling of bitterness and complacent resignation. Enter The Nose.

Opening the pages of this Melbourne-based indie broadsheet is refreshing.

Boldly delivering a format in decline, the editorial states: ‘we decided to make The Nose because print media in Australia stinks.’

While the establishment make last-ditch efforts to sustain a readership with sensational headlines and a condescending approximation of ‘journalism’, these optimistic upstarts are ready to give a discerning and disillusioned public what they are missing.

In their third issue, The Nose makes good on its promise to provide a platform for news articles written with clarity, insight and integrity.

A far cry from the student magazine I’d taken it for, The Nose blends a tongue-in-cheek irreverence with a commitment to honest, enlightening journalism and graceful prose.

Adam Brereton’s article Katter opens with an insightful reflection on his time spent with Bob Katter at the Mt. Isa Rodeo. It took me by surprise: where the mainstream media are quick to make a joke of the politician, Brereton’s in-depth, incisive work of investigative journalism gives its readers the space to make up their own minds about the man.

Over the page is an exposé of Melbourne’s BDSM community by Dom Amerena. Without taking advantage of its potential shock value, the article displays a refreshing sensitivity toward its subject matter and presenting the intricacies of the Master/slave lifestyle with a relieving sense of maturity.

Shedding light on ‘the Tibetans you’ve never heard of’, Lucas Smith’s 10 Conditions of Oppression is an eloquently written investigation into the Uyghur people – an underrepresented ethnic minority in China’s Xinjiang region.

The book reviews included are works in their own right, providing a compelling insight into the author, the novel and their respective place within the literary landscape. Defying my expectations, I had one critic talking me out of Dave Eggers’ A Hologram For The King while another had me prepared to purchase a copy of J.K. Rowling’s The Casual Vacancy. To its credit, The Nose includes reviews of local authors: an extended critique of Jeff Sparrow’s Money Shot and a page on local poets Nathan Cunrow and Kevin Brophy’s collaboration, Radar.

As an extra treat, Issue 3 features an impressive literary spread: an extract from Justin Clemens’ latest instalment of mock epic The Mundiad; an untitled lyric from overlooked Russian poet Vladislave Khodasevich; and a gripping short story from young writer John Morrissey.

If you’ve lost faith in the news, it’s time to pick up a copy of The Nose. Trulya showcase for these talented Australian journalists, with fresh perspectives and unique voices, this is independent media at its best. Established media outlets could learn a thing or two from this young publication.

 

Christopher Fieldus is an editorial assistant at Kill Your Darlings. He is a freelance theatre reviewer, published on samesame.com.au, and Head Editor of Mary Journal.