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Category Archives: comedy


Jerks, antiheroes and failed adulthood in You’re The Worst and BoJack Horseman

In addition to both being really funny, two new US comedies – You’re The Worst and BoJack Horseman – speak to a widely-held fear about what, exactly, constitutes ‘adulthood’. Read more »

Funny Broads

‘All comparisons between Girls and Broad City should be hereto forth banned from the internet.’ I agree with Katherine Brooks. Yet the comparisons continue, ad nauseam, mostly following one of two lines of thought. Read more »

Not so ‘quiche': Chris Lilley’s Ja’mie: Private School Girl

If we’ve learnt anything from Chris Lilley’s latest series Ja’mie: Private School Girl, it’s that no one in their right mind wants to see Ja’mie topless. Once you look past Ja’mie’s bizarre and frankly creepy on-stage disrobing at the climax of the series (if you even can … Read more »

Godfather of Carnage: Dance of Death at Malthouse Theatre

The underside of the marriage plot is the marriage-as-blood-sport plot. In 1900 the so-heralded ‘father of modern Swiss literature’, August Strindberg, wrote a theatrical template for the marriage-turned-sour drama called The Dance with Death. In it, an ailing artillery captain and military writer, Edgar, faces off with … Read more »

Podcast: The ethics of comedy

From Seth MacFarlane hosting this year’s Oscars, to the controversy around rape jokes following the Daniel Tosh fiasco in 2012, this podcast discusses the role of the comedian, their relationship to ethics, power and privilege, and the concept of ‘kicking up, not down’. Writer and broadcaster Jessica … Read more »

Amusements and distractions

Killings brings you our weekly selection of posts that have amused, enlightened and generally distracted us. Hello again, The Great Gatsby game, welcome back to my life. This is why bookmarks were invented. (Make sure you read the ‘about’ gold!) The ABC of Architects video is educational, … Read more »

Editors’ picks: Benedict Cumberbatch’s Neck Edition

Rebecca Starford, Editor My pick for this month is the BBC adaptation of Ford Madox Ford’s tetralogy, Parade’s End. The four related novels (that’s what a tetralogy is – don’t worry, I didn’t know either) were published between 1924 and 1928. Set mainly in England and on … Read more »

You Look Nice Today: a journal of emotional hygiene

You Look Nice Today is the sound of Twitter on tape. The three hosts stumbled upon one another in the social media platform’s infancy, and were encouraged by another tweeter to document their conversations in a more substantial medium. Read more »

‘There aren’t any funny women out there': perceptions of gender in stand-up comedy

Of the 202 Australian stand-up shows at this year’s Melbourne International Comedy Festival, less than 25% of the acts were by solo women or women-only teams. I wasn’t particularly surprised about this, since gender imbalances are common in other creative industries (such as writing, as we know) but my inner feminist was still left feeling rather pummelled. Read more »

Podcast: Lawrence Leung’s beginning, middle and end

What makes a story? Is it the structure, the way you tell it, the characters within? Lawrence Leung and I got together to discuss erotic fan fiction, the best way to tell stories, untrue stories and the elusive Ira Glass. Lawrence Leung is an award-winning Australian comedian … Read more »