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Category Archives: Books


For Whom The Bell Jar Tolls

I have read The Bell Jar every summer for seven years, not only as a reminder of my own descent into depression during my estranged periods, but as a symbol of my success in defeating the precarious ‘bell jar’ that hangs low above Esther throughout her travels in the Big Apple. Read more »

Literary Listening: The rise of the podcast as literary form

Audio programs – both musical and, increasingly, vocal – are being listened to on the move and in growing numbers. But podcasts in particular represent more than the latest iteration of portable radio. Podcasts represent an atomisation of experience, muffling the sounds of the immediate environment and removing the individual from a synchronous community of listeners. Read more »

Best of 2014 (Part One): TV, Books, Technology

In the first of a two-part series, our brilliant Killings contributors highlight their top cultural moments of 2014 – in television, books and technology. Read more »

Dark Places and Safe Spaces: S.A. Jones’ Isabelle of the Moon and Stars

S.A. Jones’ Isabelle of the Moon and Stars is a powerful and affecting depiction of a young woman struggling with mental illness and emotional turmoil. Read more »

Taking Christmas off the shelf

Ah, Christmas – for some, a time of gift-giving, awkward family gatherings and over-zealous consumption of rum balls; for booksellers, a time to weep silent tears of stress and experience the irrational but persistent fear of being buried alive beneath boxes of the latest Stephen Fry memoir. Read more »

The modern epistolary novel: Annabel Smith’s The Ark

Annabel Smith has given the epistolary novel a twenty-first century reboot in her recently-released dystopian novel The Ark. Told through emails, blogs, procedural reports, speech transcripts and the occasional newspaper clipping, this impressive technical feat of storytelling is a clever and appropriate twinning of form and function. Read more »

Living on fans: The Art of Asking by Amanda Palmer

Rather than enticing people to pay for music through marketing campaigns and radio play, Amanda Palmer is interested in connecting with her fans, becoming friends with them, and creating a system of exchange within the community that is formed. This means that art is not often payed for with money. Read more »

Closet Concerns: Women in Clothes

Women in Clothes wants to tell a more inclusive story, to reveal the pleasures, hang-ups and complexities that reside in the simple act of dressing ourselves, and to remind us that we don’t perform our style rituals in a vacuum. Read more »

The Harp in the South and other stories I wasn’t taught at school

The classics I studied at school were certainly great works, but how relevant are these books to young Australians? Yes, they were valuable to study as examples of technical skill. But they were all by men, all white and all dead. Read more »

The witch is dead: Hilary Mantel’s The Assassination of Margaret Thatcher

This macabre short story collection is a reminder that Mantel’s gifts extend far beyond the meticulously researched historical fiction that finally won her the literary accolades she’s long deserved. Read more »