KILLINGS, daily columns and blog —

The Pot at the End of the Rainbow: Ben Mendelsohn bets large in Mississippi Grind

Mississippi Grind‘s two protagonists are Gerry (recently resurgent Australian actor Ben Mendelsohn), a hopeless addict, and Curtis (Ryan Reynolds), a charismatic stranger who saunters into Gerry’s poker game and comes to seem like the personification of good luck. Read more »

A Glitch in the System: The ABC’s undead gamble

In one gasping breath, Glitch shows that the ABC is stumbling towards something beloved by TV audiences the world over, but that regularly eludes the Australian and film and TV industry: genre. And not just any genre, but the ‘return-from-the-dead’ zombie-style genre. Read more »

Mythic Noncompliance: An interview with feminist comic book writer Kelly Sue DeConnick

Kelly Sue DeConnick is forthright about her literary feminism. ‘When we limit ourselves to stories about men,’ she says, ‘and assume a readership that reflects the protagonist, we send the message to everyone else that they are other, that there is some kind of default human being, and they are not it.’ Read more »

Life is a Hallway: Watching, Waiting and Passing Through

In her previous column, Angela Meyer mentioned that a writer has certain concerns and fascinations. This month she goes beyond the entranceway to explore one of her own… Read more »

Announcing the S.D. Harvey Short Story Award shortlist

We’re pleased to announce the shortlist for the 2015 S.D. Harvey Short Story Award, announced today at the Byron Bay Writers Festival by Australian Crime Writers Association (ACWA) President Michael Robotham. Read more »

By Screen Light

Television and depression have a history together. We’re all familiar with the trope: the person who stays in on a Saturday night watching TV in their pyjamas is the sad schlub with no life. Read more »

On Being An Expert: Eliza Henry-Jones on writing fiction

When I look back at the myriad of novel manuscripts I wrote as a teenager – both finished and incomplete (and all terrible) – I am struck by how much I have used fiction to understand. Read more »

Gnarly Family Trees: Truth, Beauty and Love My Way

Ahead of her Melbourne Writers Festival event with Claudia Karvan and John Edwards, Rochelle Siemienowicz reflects on what makes Love My Way a binge-worthy Australian TV classic. Read more »

There is No Normal: Rachel Hill’s The Sex Myth

Feminist and journalist Rachel Hills spent seven years researching the limits of our cultural understanding of sex. In what may bring huge relief to readers, the resulting book, The Sex Myth, proves through scientific and anecdotal evidence (Hills conducted almost a thousand interviews around the Western world) that when it comes to sex, there is no normal. Read more »

Local Courage, Global Reach: The National Play Festival

There is something to be gained from observing any collection of works in close proximity, and in these readings you could see the way Australian playwrights are reaching out into the world. Together, these works show the minds of our playwrights in robust health, with works that are itching to find their audience. Read more »