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Author Archives: Carody Culver


Girls, eat your hearts out

Middle class hipsters, conceptual artists and third-wave feminists have long been easy targets for mockery, so I admit that I wasn’t expecting anything too groundbreaking when I picked up Zoe Pilger’s Eat My Heart Out, a satirical romp through contemporary London that reads like a surreal mash-up of Broad City, Bridget Jones’s Diary and Less Than Zero. Read more »

Houston, we have a fabrication

As someone who doesn’t have children, I’m no less resistant than any of my book-loving friends-with-kids to the charm of a beautiful picture book. So when I spotted Laika: Astronaut Dog by writer and illustrator Owen Davey, with its charming retro-style artwork Read more »

WASPiration: David Gilbert’s & Sons

As someone who’s always secretly aspired to being a WASP (before you mercilessly judge me for this, I should clarify that my desire has less to do with attaining elevated social and financial status than with being able to dress like a character in The Great Gatsby Read more »

The pseudonymous critic

Last Saturday saw the debut of the aptly named The Saturday Paper, a new publication from Schwartz Publishing (the same folks who bring us the Monthly and Quarterly Essay). With an emphasis on long-form journalism, the first serious print newspaper to be Read more »

Behind you! Return of the zombie apocalypse in MR Carey’s The Girl with All the Gifts

  ‘The most heartbreaking, mind-bending thriller of 2014!’ declares my review copy of MR Carey’s blockbuster thriller The Girl with All the Gifts. ‘Just 2014?’ my partner declared with a raised eyebrow upon seeing this glowing recommendation. ‘Not very confident, are they?’ Breathless hype over a book … Read more »

Click trick: the blog-to-book phenomenon

Back in the early 2000s, a twenty-something New Yorker with a soul-crushing secretarial job suddenly started living every blogger’s dream: she scored a publishing deal to turn her popular food blog, The Julie/Julia Project, into a book. The result, 2005’s Julie & Julia: 365 Days, 524 Recipes, … Read more »

Going by the book in 2014

As January draws to a close, I suppose it’s finally time to accept that the holiday period is well and truly over (it takes some of us a little longer than others to acknowledge the rude and sudden resumption of Real Life). For booksellers, the reality generally … Read more »

Eleven years later: Donna Tartt’s The Goldfinch

A friend and I used to joke that if we ever became famous writers, we’d make sure that our author photos were just like Donna Tartt’s: dramatic, dimly lit and slightly unsettling. Inside the back cover flap of my dog-eared, spine-trashed copy of Tartt’s cult classic debut … Read more »

The 2013 Man Booker Shortlist: Jim Crace’s Harvest

The Man Booker Prize, launched in 1969, aims to promote the finest in fiction by rewarding the year’s best novel written by a citizen of the United Kingdom, the Commonwealth or the Republic of Ireland. Carody Culver delves into one of the shortlisted works of 2013–Jim Crace’s … Read more »

I won’t be eating my words: narrative in cookbooks

Until this year, cookbooks had managed to evade all those doomsday prophecies about the death of the book. But in March, a Sydney Morning Herald article dared to ask the question on every worried bibliophile’s mind: is the cookbook dead? Have food blogs, cooking apps and ebooks … Read more »