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See Kill Your Darlings at the Sydney Writers’ Festival!

by Kill Your Darlings , May 12, 2014Leave a comment

Sydney Writers Festival logo

The 2014 Sydney Writers’ Festival officially kicks off Monday 19th May. You can catch two members of the Kill Your Darlings team at the following events.

See Publishing Director Hannah Kent in:

Adapt or Die: Small Start, Global Finish
The Australian film industry is a small pond, but some local storytellers have jumped overseas to achieve international success. Hannah Kent’s Burial Rites has recently been optioned for a Hollywood adapatation, with Jennifer Lawrence attached to star. She discusses the art of telling stories with universal resonance, along with producer Ross Grayson Bell (Fight Club), author Graeme Simsion (The Rosie Project); and film producer Ian Collie (Saving Mr Banks).

And our Interviews Editor Bethanie Blanchard will be appearing in:

Short and Sweet
What it lacks in length, the short story form makes up for in expressiveness and potential. Bethanie Blanchard speaks with four authors who find that the short story form is not too long, not too short, but just right. Featuring Angela Meyer (Captives), Tony Birch (The Promise), Ceridwen Dovey (Only the Animals) and Kyoko Yoshida (Disorientalism).

On Craft: Storytelling and the Storyteller
Beloved storyteller Lian Hearn talks with Bethanie Blanchard about the craft of writing and ways of telling stories. Hearn’s brilliantly conceived and beautifully executed stories captivate readers of all ages.

Bookings required. The entire Sydney Writers’ Festival program can be viewed at www.swf.org.au.




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