KYDYAC

KYD YA Championship – contributors, titles and how to win

by Stephanie Van Schilt , July 27, 201216 Comments
Image credit: Wonderlane

Happy almost weekend everyone! Our usual Friday Amusement and distractions posts are on hiatus for the next few weeks because something special is going on here at Killings

Are you getting ready? Are you getting excited? Get your books out and your voting caps on because the KYD YA Championship starts next week!

From Monday 30 July until 17 August, contributors will be championing their favourite Australian YA classic from the last 30 years. At the end of each post, you will have the chance to vote to determine the winner – just follow the links.

And don’t forget that when you vote, you go into the draw to be a winner yourself – we have three amazing YA prize packs from our friends at Allen & Unwin, Penguin and Hardie Grant Egmont to give away.

Can’t wait until Monday to find out who is involved and what books will be discussed? Good, because the wait is over! Our eleven contributors and contenders for the KYDYAC crown are *drum roll* …

  • Kate O’Donnell on Tomorrow, When the War Began by John Marsden (1993)
  • Andrew McDonald on Space Demons by Gillian Rubinstein (1985)
  • Agnes Nieuwenhuizen on Looking For Alibrandi by Melina Marchetta (1992)
  • Judith Ridge on Loving Athena by Joanne Horniman (1997)
  • Lili Wilkinson on Obernewtyn by Isobelle Carmody (1987)
  • Holly Harper on Sabriel by Garth Nix (1995)
  • Ruth Starke on Deadly, Unna? By Phillip Gwynne (1999)
  • Alyssa Brugman on Fortress by Gabrielle Lord (1980)
  • Adele Walsh on Mandragora by David McRobbie (1994)
  • Bec Kavanagh on Came Back to Show You I Could Fly by Robin Klein (1991)
  • Jordi Kerr on The Ghost’s Child by Sonya Hartnett (2007)

If your favourite Australian YA book from the last thirty years isn’t featured in our shortlist, never fear – from Monday you can vote for it to be the KYDYAC People’s Choice winner.

We’d also love to hear from you about KYDYAC or YA in general, so jump in on the comments, follow us on Twitter (@kyd_journal, #KYDYAC) and Facebook. Also, for all updates, sign up to our e-News or subscribe to the Killings RSS feed.




  • Liza

    When you see it laid out like this, you can see what a golden age the 80s and 90s were for Oz YA – it’s a fabulous list.

  • http://www.beantherereadthat.com kate o’d

    Hoo boy, get ready. This is exciting. What a brilliant list. Though, I shall not be distracted from my book, not my my champion book, oh my sure winner…ooh, Jo Horniman, Sonya Hartnett,SPACE DEMONS!…no no. Keep on track, Kate…

  • http://www.jordikerr.com Jordi

    Am I the youngest contributor?? Representing the ’00s!

  • http://www.misrule.com.au/wordpress Judith

    Is it any coincidence that the KYDYAC is running at the same time at that other minor competition… the Olympics? I think not. Let the Games Begin! (And you all have to vote for Loving Athena because it is one of THE great under-recognised Australian YA books of all time.) (Plus I will send you dark chocolate licorice bullets if you do.)

  • http://www.misrule.com.au/wordpress Judith

    Also, small technical correction: There is no “I” at the beginning of Came Back to Show you I Could Fly. Bonus points (and dark chocolate licorice bullets) to those of us old enough to remember the song (and singer) it is a quote from.

    • Stephanie Van Schilt

      Hi Judith! Thanks ever so much for picking that up – all fixed now. The KYD team are so excited!! Let the championship begin!
      Jordi – Your book IS the youngest…but perhaps one of the many amazing titles released in the ’00s will take out the KYDYAC People’s Choice?

  • JessB

    Oh no, I love most of those books! How will I ever vote for just one?!

    Can’t wait to read the posts, I came here from Bec’s Facebook page, and I’m so excited to have discovered your site!

  • Julia T

    Hehe I remember listening to the Came back To Show You I Could Fly song, when I studied the novel in Year 9 English! Can’t remember the artist or name of the track, but now I have the words stuck in my head…and I want to go home and read the book!

    • Judith Ridge

      No dark chocolate bullets for you, Julia!

      • Jon

        Marcia Hines, ‘From the Inside’, 1974.

  • http://www.beckavanaghreads.wordpress.com Bec

    Ooh, such a great list! Space Demons is definitely up there for me (although coming a close second of course to ‘Came Back To Show You I Could Fly). I feel like rushing down to the library and revisiting my whole YA reading list right now!

  • http://www.lisadempster.com.au lisa dempster

    Haha – literary Olympics. Classic. I am pained about what to vote for in the gold category though!

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